Pre-Advanced Placement English

Pre-AP Honors English 10 Course Syllabus

 

Mr. Stephen J. Sampson                                           Room 114/Phone C: 810-334-0195

Capac High School                                                             Prep Hour: 4th

541 N. Glassford                                                                Email: ssampson@capacschools.us

Capac, MI 48014                                                                Blog: https://capacpreap.wordpress.com/

 

Course Overview:

Pre-AP Honors English 10 will engage students in becoming skilled readers of various genres. The texts represent a variety of literary periods and disciplines. Students will also be engaged in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Students will be challenged to analyze texts recognized for their literary merit using the elements of fiction, poetry, and drama. They will learn to recognize different writing types and forms as well as various aspects of rhetoric. Through recognition and practice, students will be able to utilize this knowledge through their own reading and writing.  Student’s efforts will help prepare them for the college-level work done in AP Literature and AP Language courses. It is hoped that my students will gain the confidence and know-how to move on to those AP courses their junior and senior years!

 

After being immersed in various texts, my students will learn how authors use and have used their voices to express themselves and how those texts apply to real life. The texts used and authors read have been selected from a variety of professional sources including but not limited to the College Board list of “Representative Authors.” Performance expectations are appropriately high, and the workload is challenging. Students are expected to commit to daily homework. Often, work involves long-term writing and reading assignments, group and individual projects, so effective time management is important.

 

Personal Philosophy:

Through the Pre-AP Honors English 10 course, Capac students will gain an appreciation and affinity for the art that literature and rhetoric encompass. Through numerous individual and cooperative projects, students will gain the confidence they need to express themselves with the words they write as well as the words they speak not only in class but in the world outside the classroom. It is imperative that students find their own voices and make them powerful! I want my students to use their education to make changes in their world and the communities they live.

 

Our yearlong mantra will be: 

As the leaders of tomorrow, we will learn to use our voices, stay agile, alert, and flexible using our newfound knowledge in the pursuit of our goals.

 

“Don’t just stand there. Be someone!” –She Quotes

 

“I AM…” Two of the most powerful words, for what you put after them shapes your reality.    --Quotediary.me

Course Goals

Students will…

develop a deeper appreciation of various works of literary merit.
improve critical reading and analytical strategies.
actively read and discuss works while questioning the author’s purpose and biases.
advance vocabulary skills to cope with unfamiliar language.
write to understand, explain, and evaluate.
develop a maturity and sophistication of rhetoric, style, and conventions of standard formal written English.
enhance their appreciation of the roles that historical context and social values play in the development and interpretation of works of literary merit.
be able to understand and use literary terms and key concepts to illuminate texts.
understand the uses of figurative and literal language.
sharpen analytical skills and learn to independently recognize key passages, and understand their contribution to overall meaning.
understand how form relates to content and how an author’s style contributes to meaning.
make connections to the world around them through thematic similarities.
learn to discover voice as it applies to them communicating their unique voice verbally and written.
learn to initiate and sustain discussions of topics.

 

Learning Strategies

The following strategies will be used both inside and outside of the classroom to facilitate student learning:

read aloud
Immersion
Close Reading (annotation, various dialectical journals, graphic organizers)
Manipulatives (drawings, posters, brainstorming-clusters, graphs, tables, maps, props,

multimedia presentations, storyboards, story maps)

Visuals (study-prints, textbook-illustrations, overhead-projected prints, reproductions of

paintings, and documents)

Graphic Organizers (advanced, Venn diagrams, and webs)
Literature Circles
Class discussion (substantive conversation)
Group and individual projects
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading)
Annotation
Dialectical journals

 

 

 

 

SOAPStone: (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject)

SOAPS is a strategy that will enable students to more effectively analyze and discuss text.
Speaker – identity of the voice within the text
Occasion – time and place
Audience – readers to whom the writer is “speaking”
Purpose – reason for the text
Subject – topic or focus of the text

Socratic Circles (as developed by S. Copeland):

 

Vocabulary Component

Students will be introduced to critical vocabulary throughout the year, including root words, powerful words every graduate needs to know, common allusions, literary and poetic terms, analytical writing terms, etc. (see attachments)

 

Summer Reading and Activities Component:

Writers and readers continually hone their art. It is because of the writers’ careful text construction that we, the readers, can connect personally to the issues, themes, and characters an author presents, which is why readers love to read. After all the analysis and thought and discussion, if we remain untouched, we have missed the true beauty of literature. It is important that we are touched throughout our lives by excellent writing so that we develop a lifelong literacy.

 

As students of excellent writers, we must become excellent analytical readers continually practicing our art throughout the year, not only inside the traditional school time frame but during the summer as well. The Pre-AP and AP English programs traditionally include summer reading geared to prepare students for the coming year and concepts to come. We will hit the ground running in September with a discussion and analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird read this summer.

 

Summer novels:

Read the following novels:

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

 

Additionally, you will form and participate in Living-Learning Communities (LLC) for group projects as well as blogging all summer not only about the assigned novel but also over numerous other relevant topics to prepare for the upcoming school year and life beyond the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is an LLC?

A Living-Learning Community is a group of people who share common emotions, values or beliefs, are actively engaged in learning together from each other, and by habituation (LLCs are common when you move to college, hence the “habitation” definition). Such communities have become the template for a cohort-based, interdisciplinary approach to higher education (Goodyear, P., De Laat, M., and Lally, V.).

 

The camaraderie of co-enrollment may help students stay in school longer, but learning communities can offer more: curricular coherence; integrative, high-quality learning; collaborative knowledge-construction; and skills and knowledge relevant to living in a complex, messy, diverse world (Lardner and Malnarich Evergreen State College).

 

Summer Expectations Checklist: (all due dates notated at https://capacpreap.wordpress.com/)

Discuss and create an LLC (last week of school before summer break)
Create Wordpress accounts and login (last week of school before break)
Complete assignments outlined on our Blog
On index cards, define the 100 power vocabulary terms using specific types of sentences
Cut, paste, and study the 72 cards on analyzing literature
Study 108 root words
Read the various handouts as outlined on the blog
Read one novel
Complete the assignments for the novels

 

Classroom Standards and Policies

To function at a high level, it’s imperative for students to strive to adhere to the following policies (The student handbook will be followed):

 

Be Prompt: Be inside the classroom when the bell rings

Be Prepared: Come to class ready to learn with proper materials and supplies

Be Polite: We will challenge each other, yet respect people’s rights and opinions

Be Attentive: Practice listening actively, participating, and raising your hand

Be Responsible: Ask for help, do your part, and challenge yourself

 

Classroom Supplies

You will find it useful to have on hand the following:

            1 box of tissues

            1 pack of 3 x 5 index cards

            Flash drive

            Loose leaf paper

            Multi-pack of Highlighters

            Pens and pencils

 

 

Grading:

The percentage breakdown for the semester is as follows:

Compositions and Projects                             40%
Class work and Homework                             40%    
Semester Exams (1 each semester)                20%

Grading Scale:

90-100 = A; 80-89 = B; 70-79 = C; 60-69 = D; 0 – 59 = E

 

Composition Guidelines (40%):

Typed, black ink
12-point font
Times New Roman, Palatino Linotype, or Calibri
Standard Margins
Heading with your name, date, and assignment
Title

Class work and Homework (40%):

Check-plus, Check, Check-minus

Since the goal of AP Language and Composition is the improvement of student’s abilities as readers and writers, we will do numerous activities that concentrate on student’s achieving that goal. These assignments are generally much shorter than full compositions and reading assignments. They are, however, no less important. In fact, these assignments provide wonderful opportunities for students to hone their skills.
The checks are a way for me to give the student immediate feedback on a short assignments. Though these assignments do not weigh heavily on your overall grade, they are extremely important in the student’s overall success.
When a student earns a check or a check - , they may revisit the exercise, seek additional help, attempt new strategies, redo the assignment and seek an improved grade!
A check + is worth an A (100%)
A check    is worth a C (75%)
A check – is worth a D (65%)

Semester Exams (20%):

Two semester exams accumulate 20% of your grade

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Integrity

Students are expected to engage in honest behavior and respectfulness at all times.

 

Cheating and Plagiarism

You will be responsible for using MLA format (internal, parenthetical documentation) for all quoted material and borrowed ideas – even if you paraphrase them. If you need such documentation in a paper, then you must also provide a properly formatted list of Works Cited, no matter how short the paper. Pre-AP students are expected to follow standard procedures for proper documentation as a matter of course. Plagiarism also occurs when attempting to pass off someone else’s work as your own whether you are conscious of it or not! We will follow the rules concerning cheating and plagiarism as outlined in Capac’s Student Handbook.

 

Absences and Make-up Work:

Students are responsible for making up any work they missed while absent. Call your LLC and get caught up because the course material will keep piling up if not taken care of. Work due on the day that was missed will be due the day the student returns to class, unless there is an extenuating reason preventing it. I will accept late work at 75% of the credit up to one day after it was due and 50% afterwards. If you are absent on the day of a quiz or test, you must be prepared to take that quiz or test the day you come back to school. All assignments will be posted on Planbook.

Due dates for long-term assignments will be given in advance. If there is a reason why you will not be in class the day the assignment is due or you are unable to complete the assignment by the due date, you must set up an appointment with me to discuss why and to seek a possible alternative. Long-term paper assignments will be turned in on the day they are due regardless if you are absent or not. If you are absent on a due date, you must arrange for your assignment to be on my desk like everyone else’s assignment. Have a parent drop it off, a friend, or email me a copy. It is your responsibility. Any long-term assignment not turned in on the due date will be considered late. 

I reserve the right to amend these policies and/or syllabus during the course of the year.

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tentative Units Outline

 

Unit One: Summer Recap and Introduction to Pre-AP Honors English 10

Theme: Gear Up, Motivation, and Groundwork

 

Analyze the summer reading

Summer Assessments

Analyze 11 blogs collected in Word

Analyze lexicon, variety, and voice
Complete a survey analyzing your own writing

Collection, processing, and assessment of summer homework
Literature Circles Rules

Rules of whole class lit circles
Rules of jigsaw LLC lit circles
Rules of small group lit circles

Socratic Circles Rules

 

Identify the key elements of the Pre-AP Honors English 10 course

Groundwork

Discuss summer dialectical journals and then check for understanding through assessment. Redirect (reteach) as necessary
Close Reading and Annotation of Texts (general)

 

Explore the different ways to be successful as an independent learner

How do I learn? (Self-reflection)

Review and implementation of learning styles and multiple intelligences

Take a learning styles and multiple intelligences test to determine strengths and weaknesses
Distribute MI products listing
Distribute Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy and prevalent verbs
Discuss

Goal setting (Self-reflection)

What is my purpose? What is my story? What do I hope to accomplish?

 

The art of storytelling

Break these chains! (Get out of your shell and attempt something new) (Speaking and leadership)

Opportunities for speaking and/or leadership engagements

Discuss the possibilities
Write about it

Everyone learns to speak into a microphone on stage

 

 

Unit Two: Literary Elements, Literary Devices, and Model Analysis

Theme: The Big Picture

 

Basic terms for literary analysis

STYLE
OPPOSITION
OBJECTIVITY
SUBJECTIVITY

 

Analyzing Literary Elements

PLOT

EXPOSITION
RISING ACTION (COMPLICATION)
CRISIS
CLIMAX
RESOLUTION

POINT OF VIEW

NARRATOR
FIRST PERSON POINT OF VIEW
UNRELIABLE NARRATOR
THIRD PERSON LIMITED POINT OF VIEW (or third person central)
THIRD PERSON OMNISCIENT POINT OF VIEW
THIRD PERSON OJECTIVE/DRAMATIC POINT OF VIEW
SHIFTING POINT OF VIEW
STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS
INTERIOR MONOLOGUE

IRONY

SITUATIONAL IRONY
VERBAL IRONY
DRAMATIC IRONY

THEME

MOTIF
MORAL

CHARACTERIZATION

DIRECT CHARACTERIZATION
INDIRECT CHARACTERIZATION

CHARACTER

PROTAGONIST

HAMARTIA
HUBRIS/HYBRIS

ANTAGONIST
CONFLICT

EXTERNAL CONFLICT
INTERNAL CONFLICT

ARCHETYPAL CHARACTERS
STATIC CHARACTER
DYNAMIC CHARACTER
FOIL CHARACTER
STEREOTYPICAL CHARACTER
CHARACTER MOTIVATION

SETTING
TONE

 

 

Analyzing Literary Devices

 

LITERARY DEVICES: are STYLE techniques a writer uses to produce a special effect in their writing. We call these style techniques tropes (also known as diction). Tropes/diction are figures of speech and/or figurative language. These style techniques are also called schemes (also known as syntax). Schemes/syntax are figures of speech.

 

It looks like this outlined:

 

LITERARY DEVICES = STYLE

STYLE IS BROKEN DOWN INTO:

TROPES/DICTION

(called figures of speech and/or figurative language)

SCHEME/SYNTAX

(called figures of speech)

 

Unit Three: Analysis through Rhetoric, Argumentation, and Model Analysis

Theme: Effective Argumentation

 

RHETORICAL DEVICES: When literary devices are used to persuade.

 

Unit Four: Synthesis

Theme: Writing the Research Paper by Synthesizing Sources

 

Unit Five: Identity

Theme: What does identity mean? How is identity formed? And how do personal experiences affect our identity?

                                      

Unit Six: Ambition and Restraint

Theme: Drive, risks, conditions, challenging the status quo, and agents of change

 

Elements of Poetry

Element of Drama

 

Unit Seven: Ethics

Theme: Who is “right” and who is “wrong?”

 

Unit Eight: Utopia/Dystopia

Theme: What makes the perfect society?

 

Unit Nine: End of the Year Project

 

 

 

 

 Pre-AP Honors English 10 Course Syllabus

 

Mr. Stephen J. Sampson                                           Room 114/Phone C: 810-334-0195

Capac High School                                                             Prep Hour:

541 N. Glassford                                                                Email: ssampson@capacschools.us

Capac, MI 48014                                                                Blog: https://capacpreap.wordpress.com/

 

Course Overview:

Pre-AP Honors English 10 will engage students in becoming skilled readers of various genres. The texts represent a variety of literary periods and disciplines. Students will also be engaged in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Students will be challenged to analyze texts recognized for their literary merit using the elements of fiction, poetry, and drama. They will learn to recognize different writing types and forms as well as various aspects of rhetoric. Through recognition and practice, students will be able to utilize this knowledge through their own reading and writing.  Student’s efforts will help prepare them for the college-level work done in AP Literature and AP Language courses. It is hoped that my students will gain the confidence and know-how to move on to those AP courses their junior and senior years!

 

After being immersed in various texts, my students will learn how authors use and have used their voices to express themselves and how those texts apply to real life. The texts used and authors read have been selected from a variety of professional sources including but not limited to the College Board list of “Representative Authors.” Performance expectations are appropriately high, and the workload is challenging. Students are expected to commit to daily homework. Often, work involves long-term writing and reading assignments, group and individual projects, so effective time management is important.

 

Personal Philosophy:

Through the Pre-AP Honors English 10 course, Capac students will gain an appreciation and affinity for the art that literature and rhetoric encompass. Through numerous individual and cooperative projects, students will gain the confidence they need to express themselves with the words they write as well as the words they speak not only in class but in the world outside the classroom. It is imperative that students find their own voices and make them powerful! I want my students to use their education to make changes in their world and the communities they live.

 

Our yearlong mantra will be: 

As the leaders of tomorrow, we will learn to use our voices, stay agile, alert, and flexible using our newfound knowledge in the pursuit of our goals.

 

“Don’t just stand there. Be someone!” –She Quotes

 

“I AM…” Two of the most powerful words, for what you put after them shapes your reality.    --Quotediary.me

Course Goals

Students will…

develop a deeper appreciation of various works of literary merit.
improve critical reading and analytical strategies.
actively read and discuss works while questioning the author’s purpose and biases.
advance vocabulary skills to cope with unfamiliar language.
write to understand, explain, and evaluate.
develop a maturity and sophistication of rhetoric, style, and conventions of standard formal written English.
enhance their appreciation of the roles that historical context and social values play in the development and interpretation of works of literary merit.
be able to understand and use literary terms and key concepts to illuminate texts.
understand the uses of figurative and literal language.
sharpen analytical skills and learn to independently recognize key passages, and understand their contribution to overall meaning.
understand how form relates to content and how an author’s style contributes to meaning.
make connections to the world around them through thematic similarities.
learn to discover voice as it applies to them communicating their unique voice verbally and written.
learn to initiate and sustain discussions of topics.

 

Learning Strategies

The following strategies will be used both inside and outside of the classroom to facilitate student learning:

read aloud
Immersion
Close Reading (annotation, various dialectical journals, graphic organizers)
Manipulatives (drawings, posters, brainstorming-clusters, graphs, tables, maps, props,

multimedia presentations, storyboards, story maps)

Visuals (study-prints, textbook-illustrations, overhead-projected prints, reproductions of

paintings, and documents)

Graphic Organizers (advanced, Venn diagrams, and webs)
Literature Circles
Class discussion (substantive conversation)
Group and individual projects
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading)
Annotation
Dialectical journals

 

 

 

 

SOAPStone: (speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject)

SOAPS is a strategy that will enable students to more effectively analyze and discuss text.
Speaker – identity of the voice within the text
Occasion – time and place
Audience – readers to whom the writer is “speaking”
Purpose – reason for the text
Subject – topic or focus of the text

Socratic Circles (as developed by S. Copeland):

 

Vocabulary Component

Students will be introduced to critical vocabulary throughout the year, including root words, powerful words every graduate needs to know, common allusions, literary and poetic terms, analytical writing terms, etc. (see attachments)

 

Summer Reading and Activities Component:

Writers and readers continually hone their art. It is because of the writers’ careful text construction that we, the readers, can connect personally to the issues, themes, and characters an author presents, which is why readers love to read. After all the analysis and thought and discussion, if we remain untouched, we have missed the true beauty of literature. It is important that we are touched throughout our lives by excellent writing so that we develop a lifelong literacy.

 

As students of excellent writers, we must become excellent analytical readers continually practicing our art throughout the year, not only inside the traditional school time frame but during the summer as well. The Pre-AP and AP English programs traditionally include summer reading geared to prepare students for the coming year and concepts to come. We will hit the ground running in September with a discussion and analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird read this summer.

 

Summer novels:

Read the following novels:

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

 

Additionally, you will form and participate in Living-Learning Communities (LLC) for group projects as well as blogging all summer not only about the assigned novel but also over numerous other relevant topics to prepare for the upcoming school year and life beyond the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is an LLC?

A Living-Learning Community is a group of people who share common emotions, values or beliefs, are actively engaged in learning together from each other, and by habituation (LLCs are common when you move to college, hence the “habitation” definition). Such communities have become the template for a cohort-based, interdisciplinary approach to higher education (Goodyear, P., De Laat, M., and Lally, V.).

 

The camaraderie of co-enrollment may help students stay in school longer, but learning communities can offer more: curricular coherence; integrative, high-quality learning; collaborative knowledge-construction; and skills and knowledge relevant to living in a complex, messy, diverse world (Lardner and Malnarich Evergreen State College).

 

Summer Expectations Checklist: (all due dates notated at https://capacpreap.wordpress.com/)

Discuss and create an LLC (last week of school before summer break)
Create Wordpress accounts and login (last week of school before break)
Complete assignments outlined on our Blog
On index cards, define the 100 power vocabulary terms using specific types of sentences
Cut, paste, and study the 72 cards on analyzing literature
Study 108 root words
Read the various handouts as outlined on the blog
Read one novel
Complete the assignments for the novels

 

Classroom Standards and Policies

To function at a high level, it’s imperative for students to strive to adhere to the following policies (The student handbook will be followed):

 

Be Prompt: Be inside the classroom when the bell rings

Be Prepared: Come to class ready to learn with proper materials and supplies

Be Polite: We will challenge each other, yet respect people’s rights and opinions

Be Attentive: Practice listening actively, participating, and raising your hand

Be Responsible: Ask for help, do your part, and challenge yourself

 

Classroom Supplies

You will find it useful to have on hand the following:

            1 box of tissues

            1 pack of 3 x 5 index cards

            Flash drive

            Loose leaf paper

            Multi-pack of Highlighters

            Pens and pencils

 

 

Grading:

The percentage breakdown for the semester is as follows:

Compositions and Projects                             40%
Class work and Homework                             40%    
Semester Exams (1 each semester)                20%

Grading Scale:

90-100 = A; 80-89 = B; 70-79 = C; 60-69 = D; 0 – 59 = E

 

Composition Guidelines (40%):

Typed, black ink
12-point font
Times New Roman, Palatino Linotype, or Calibri
Standard Margins
Heading with your name, date, and assignment
Title

Class work and Homework (40%):

Check-plus, Check, Check-minus

Since the goal of AP Language and Composition is the improvement of student’s abilities as readers and writers, we will do numerous activities that concentrate on student’s achieving that goal. These assignments are generally much shorter than full compositions and reading assignments. They are, however, no less important. In fact, these assignments provide wonderful opportunities for students to hone their skills.
The checks are a way for me to give the student immediate feedback on a short assignments. Though these assignments do not weigh heavily on your overall grade, they are extremely important in the student’s overall success.
When a student earns a check or a check - , they may revisit the exercise, seek additional help, attempt new strategies, redo the assignment and seek an improved grade!
A check + is worth an A (100%)
A check    is worth a C (75%)
A check – is worth a D (65%)

Semester Exams (20%):

Two semester exams accumulate 20% of your grade

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Integrity

Students are expected to engage in honest behavior and respectfulness at all times.

 

Cheating and Plagiarism

You will be responsible for using MLA format (internal, parenthetical documentation) for all quoted material and borrowed ideas – even if you paraphrase them. If you need such documentation in a paper, then you must also provide a properly formatted list of Works Cited, no matter how short the paper. Pre-AP students are expected to follow standard procedures for proper documentation as a matter of course. Plagiarism also occurs when attempting to pass off someone else’s work as your own whether you are conscious of it or not! We will follow the rules concerning cheating and plagiarism as outlined in Capac’s Student Handbook.

 

Absences and Make-up Work:

Students are responsible for making up any work they missed while absent. Call your LLC and get caught up because the course material will keep piling up if not taken care of. Work due on the day that was missed will be due the day the student returns to class, unless there is an extenuating reason preventing it. I will accept late work at 75% of the credit up to one day after it was due and 50% afterwards. If you are absent on the day of a quiz or test, you must be prepared to take that quiz or test the day you come back to school. All assignments will be posted on Planbook.

Due dates for long-term assignments will be given in advance. If there is a reason why you will not be in class the day the assignment is due or you are unable to complete the assignment by the due date, you must set up an appointment with me to discuss why and to seek a possible alternative. Long-term paper assignments will be turned in on the day they are due regardless if you are absent or not. If you are absent on a due date, you must arrange for your assignment to be on my desk like everyone else’s assignment. Have a parent drop it off, a friend, or email me a copy. It is your responsibility. Any long-term assignment not turned in on the due date will be considered late. 

I reserve the right to amend these policies and/or syllabus during the course of the year.

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tentative Units Outline

 

Unit One: Summer Recap and Introduction to Pre-AP Honors English 10

Theme: Gear Up, Motivation, and Groundwork

 

Analyze the summer reading

Summer Assessments

Analyze 11 blogs collected in Word

Analyze lexicon, variety, and voice
Complete a survey analyzing your own writing

Collection, processing, and assessment of summer homework
Literature Circles Rules

Rules of whole class lit circles
Rules of jigsaw LLC lit circles
Rules of small group lit circles

Socratic Circles Rules

 

Identify the key elements of the Pre-AP Honors English 10 course

Groundwork

Discuss summer dialectical journals and then check for understanding through assessment. Redirect (reteach) as necessary
Close Reading and Annotation of Texts (general)

 

Explore the different ways to be successful as an independent learner

How do I learn? (Self-reflection)

Review and implementation of learning styles and multiple intelligences

Take a learning styles and multiple intelligences test to determine strengths and weaknesses
Distribute MI products listing
Distribute Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy and prevalent verbs
Discuss

Goal setting (Self-reflection)

What is my purpose? What is my story? What do I hope to accomplish?

 

The art of storytelling

Break these chains! (Get out of your shell and attempt something new) (Speaking and leadership)

Opportunities for speaking and/or leadership engagements

Discuss the possibilities
Write about it

Everyone learns to speak into a microphone on stage

 

 

Unit Two: Literary Elements, Literary Devices, and Model Analysis

Theme: The Big Picture

 

Basic terms for literary analysis

STYLE
OPPOSITION
OBJECTIVITY
SUBJECTIVITY

 

Analyzing Literary Elements

PLOT

EXPOSITION
RISING ACTION (COMPLICATION)
CRISIS
CLIMAX
RESOLUTION

POINT OF VIEW

NARRATOR
FIRST PERSON POINT OF VIEW
UNRELIABLE NARRATOR
THIRD PERSON LIMITED POINT OF VIEW (or third person central)
THIRD PERSON OMNISCIENT POINT OF VIEW
THIRD PERSON OJECTIVE/DRAMATIC POINT OF VIEW
SHIFTING POINT OF VIEW
STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS
INTERIOR MONOLOGUE

IRONY

SITUATIONAL IRONY
VERBAL IRONY
DRAMATIC IRONY

THEME

MOTIF
MORAL

CHARACTERIZATION

DIRECT CHARACTERIZATION
INDIRECT CHARACTERIZATION

CHARACTER

PROTAGONIST

HAMARTIA
HUBRIS/HYBRIS

ANTAGONIST
CONFLICT

EXTERNAL CONFLICT
INTERNAL CONFLICT

ARCHETYPAL CHARACTERS
STATIC CHARACTER
DYNAMIC CHARACTER
FOIL CHARACTER
STEREOTYPICAL CHARACTER
CHARACTER MOTIVATION

SETTING
TONE

 

 

Analyzing Literary Devices

 

LITERARY DEVICES: are STYLE techniques a writer uses to produce a special effect in their writing. We call these style techniques tropes (also known as diction). Tropes/diction are figures of speech and/or figurative language. These style techniques are also called schemes (also known as syntax). Schemes/syntax are figures of speech.

 

It looks like this outlined:

 

LITERARY DEVICES = STYLE

STYLE IS BROKEN DOWN INTO:

TROPES/DICTION

(called figures of speech and/or figurative language)

SCHEME/SYNTAX

(called figures of speech)

 

Unit Three: Analysis through Rhetoric, Argumentation, and Model Analysis

Theme: Effective Argumentation

 

RHETORICAL DEVICES: When literary devices are used to persuade.

 

Unit Four: Synthesis

Theme: Writing the Research Paper by Synthesizing Sources

 

Unit Five: Identity

Theme: What does identity mean? How is identity formed? And how do personal experiences affect our identity?

                                      

Unit Six: Ambition and Restraint

Theme: Drive, risks, conditions, challenging the status quo, and agents of change

 

Elements of Poetry

Element of Drama

 

Unit Seven: Ethics

Theme: Who is “right” and who is “wrong?”

 

Unit Eight: Utopia/Dystopia

Theme: What makes the perfect society?

 

Unit Nine: End of the Year Project